Speaking of changes

by adustyframe ~ April 27th, 2007

Lee didn’t learn to read very well in school. He has always hated reading.

During his incarceration, he has read a lot.

He told me last night, that he checked out a book on classic literature. He’s going to go through it to see what book he wants to read.

This is also a major change. I hoped that I didn’t look at him with my eyes bugged out!

So any suggestions? What classic literature do you really enjoy?
What books should I tell him to look into?

I think he needs a fast paced very interesting story to get him hooked!

Lizzie

18 Thoughts Shared to Speaking of changes

  1. Brenda@CoffeeTeaBooksandMe

    I came to your blog through your post on mine. I haven’t had a chance to read much (because I really must get to bed soon!). However, I have been so touched by what I have read.

    Although not a trial like yours, God seems to have allowed us to also go through some severe furnace like trials. It isn’t until I looked back that I realized just how much He was in it.

    My seventeen year old son was talking to a pastor recently, a wonderful man God provided Him at his youth retreat. He asked my son to stop and think if he would be the same person he is today without all the terrible trials. I believe it was for the first time that C. realized it is the God ordained circumstances that has made him strong.

    As for classic books, my son’s favorite is The Counte of Monte Cristo (sp?). He LOVED that, I think it is a guy kind of book.

    If he hasn’t read Chuck Colson’s book called Born Again, I believe he’d like that. (Not a classic but the story of Colson’s coming to the Lord and his prison experience.)

    I pray God’s love and peace for you!

  2. Ame

    i’m not a good source of stuff like this … but mike duran at decompose is. i’m sure he wouldn’t mind you emailing him – give him a little info and tell him i sent you for good suggestions on good books – he’s brilliant and LOVES great literature!!!!! not only that, he is VERY informed!!!

    mike’s email address: cirdog@yahoo.com

    he is a wonderful Christian man, married for oodles of years and has four grown children. if you want to know more about him, he wrote his story recently in three parts – worth your time even if you don’t feel comfortable emailing him. but, because of his background, and the kind of man he is, i think he would be able to recommend some excellent books for Lee.

    http://mikeduran.com/?p=522
    http://mikeduran.com/?p=526
    http://mikeduran.com/?p=532

  3. Helen

    Now you got me thinking what “classic” really includes 🙂 … But a real classic for me is “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” which I could hardly let go.

  4. Grandparents Corner

    I’m not a very good source for literature books, but a search on Amazon.com might help you decide; possibly on eBay as well.

    I wanted to ask if you know whether Sergio has a Bible? If not, will the prison allow for you to have one shipped to him through a book store? I wasn’t sure if the prison provided Bibles, or even if non-family members like you can have something shipped to another incarcerated person. I’m hoping they do provide them Bibles, but if not, I’m willing to help you get him one in the same way I helped out before. I feel it’s so important to put a Bible in the hands of those just coming to the Lord, or those who we are speaking to about God. BTW, you could also create a wish list at Amazon, if you haven’t already. The address, city and state do not show for you or your husband when a person decides to buy something from the wish list to help out, or on special occasions. You can publish a link to your wish list on your blog site and others can help you obtain books, Bibles or other helpful things, or send the link only to those friends or family you wish to have it. I know some mothers who use a wish list to give to family when their kids are about to have birthdays as it helps the family to know what items are appropriate or what items the kids are wanting. It’s something for you to think about anyway. Sorry, I get so wordy. Hugs & prayers, Bonnie

  5. Kathy F.

    My daughter is reading “The Once and Future King” by T.H. White, which is one of her books for Ambleside Online this year. It’s funny, fast-paced and a good all-around read. She is really enjoying it! (She reads a TREMENDOUS amount of books and highly recommends this one).
    So, try this one. Also, “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens is good. But I would read “The Once and Future King” first.
    Hope this helps a little bit!

  6. Lucy

    The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad is quite a good man’s book. Anything by John Buchan – not really great literature but just ripping yarns from the early 20th century about spies, heroes and wars, mainly. Now my mind is boggling to consider what your dh might consider fast paced and interesting……Moby Dick? The Scarlet Badge of Courage?

  7. PrayerSister

    Ben Hur — think chariot races & gladiators

    Ivanhoe — swash-buckling adventure — a real Robin Hood story!

    Pilgrim’s Progress – though it’s a slow read

  8. Chel

    “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee. It’s a poignant tale of standing up for the right person and the right thing even if everything surrounding you says it’s wrong. (I don’t comment often, but I read your blog regularly and pray for all of you.)

  9. adustyframe

    Thank you all! I will copy your list and mail it to him.

    Grandparents corner;) I will see if Sergio can get a Bible.

    Thanks so much for the Amazon wishlist idea. I didn’t even know how it worked!
    Thanks:)

  10. celina

    i was also gonna say to kill a mockingbird…

    i also liked hemingway old man and the sea..

    dh liked grapes of wrath, i liked east of eden..

    what would be awesome is for you 2 to do a book club, read the same book at the same time and then you can discuss if you dont want to waste your face to face time, write it out in letters

  11. Maureen E

    My friend (a guy) gave me some ideas:

    The Three Musketeers
    Summer of ’49
    Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer
    Grapes of Wrath
    A Tale of Two Cities
    The Histories by Herodotus
    Hamlet
    Midsummer Night’s Dream
    Iliad
    Oddessey
    The Great Gatsby

  12. PrayerSister

    dh says Red Badge of Courage

  13. adustyframe

    Thanks all! I’ll send them to him.

  14. Ashley

    I highly recommend the “Count of Monte Cristo” too. That’s one of my favorites.

    “To Kill a Mockingbird” is a bit of an easier read; it’s also good.

    “A Tale of Two Cities” is a bit more difficult, but exciting once you get into it.

    Same with “Grapes of Wrath”

    Glad to hear your husband is taking an interest in reading. 🙂

  15. Mary

    Hey

    I will second the “The Once and Future King” suggestion. Also the Scarlet Pimpernel (though I forgot the author). Ivanhoe is good, but the first hundred pages or so are a hard read, might be discouraging.

    Praise God that SO many things are improving for your family

    Mary

  16. Maureen E

    Ooh, good ones Mary!! Baronness Orczy is the author of Scarlet Pimpernel.

  17. adustyframe

    Thanks again all:)

    I’m excited to send him this list;)

    Mary–unfortunately if the 1st 100 pages are boring I’m fairly sure he will not read it!

  18. Janine Cate

    Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. The musical is pretty wow too, but I would read the book first. A major theme in the book is the concept of Grace or Mercy versus The Law.

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